Extra Credits: Myers Briggs and Character Creation

This week, we discuss a handy method for broadly defining one's characters.

Episode video is on YouTube

Show Notes:

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Recent Comments:

  • Can you guys include resources to the chart and other information on Myers-Briggs? Would love to read up more.

    http://www.myersbriggs.org/my-mbti-personality-type/mbti-basics/the-16-mbti-types.asp
    Is that what you're looking for?

    I'm curious as to what other sorts of generalizations/correlations could be drawn from these types. For example, the local university draws a lot of engineering students, and I've learned that a lot of them are INTJ. Kinda makes me wonder what other personality types/professions tend to go together.

    One problem I have with the assessment is it presents each variable as dichotomous. I've never formally taken the full assessment, but some of the free versions online tell you how closely aligned you are with each variable. For example, I was nearly 100% Introverted, but between Thinking and Feeling, it put me at Feeling with a 4%. The types don't include any mention of degree, and don't allow any room for people who score strongly for both or neither.

    That said, despite it's shortcomings as a tool for real people, it's a useful skeleton for characters. They'll still need to be fleshed out but it really is a great starting point.


  • One problem I have with the assessment is it presents each variable as dichotomous. I've never formally taken the full assessment, but some of the free versions online tell you how closely aligned you are with each variable. For example, I was nearly 100% Introverted, but between Thinking and Feeling, it put me at Feeling with a 4%. The types don't include any mention of degree, and don't allow any room for people who score strongly for both or neither.

    I think the tests just like to give you some approximation of who close you were to the other value. Each of the values are binary, with you being either a T or an F, however things get rather nebulous when you delve into the functions and especially so once you realise one function can be used to mimic another.

    Every type uses both sensing and perceiving, thinking and feeling, what MBTI does is categorise how and which order they prefer to use these. Say you're an INFJ, your function order goes Ni > Fe > Ti > Se which means you favour introverted intuition over extroverted feeling over introverted thinking over extroverted sensing.

    I feel like I should stop now lest I overload people with information.

    Other than the MBTI, what other means can be used for character creation?

    Can they be mixed and matched with each other?

    When I hung around MBTI boards one form of other personality test kept cropping up which was enneagram. It's a good compliment to MBTI whether or not you think it's a load of bunk.

  • Great episode about utilizing psychology to develop characters.

    I would strongly recommend using Keirsey over MBTI. His work stems from more actual research, and in my experience, his work has put a lot more thought into the ways these personality definitions interact and the ways these really affect different aspects of our lives. I would highly recommend picking up a copy of Please Understand Me, which explains Keirsey's system.

    Overall though, great topic.

  • Oh God, psychology, just as my head was starting to hurt... Oh man, this is all such fascinating stuff, but it's just so much to take in!

    Categorizing people... I know people who hate being defined by a label or system and reject any notions of that system or labels. I don't mind, I think it's useful, but I acknowledge when they might be off or harmful.

    Actually I find this fascinating, because I find a lot of myself applied through this system. I'm kind of an introvert, and I DO try to be sociable, but it gets tiring... I'm also more of a sensing sort then someone who follows their intuition... I'm VERY particular in how I go about things, and I'd like to know what I'm getting into instead of just knowing I'll make it through. The "Feeling vs. Thinking" thing, I saw this TV Tropes article that talks about the issue that they're not always opposed to each other, that someone can be both a thinker AND trusts their feelings as well. But like Dan said, this system doesn't apply to everyone and isn't 100% true, so I shouldn't get that worked up over that. Though MovieBob always says that people are divided into "Thinkers and Believers", and it feels like they usually are opposed to each other in real life... I find myself more of a thinker, though I'm also a feeler as well, in some cases. (I'm also a little upset that they used Spock as an example of a thinker, but not "Bones" McCoy as an example as a feeler, but whatever.)

    I feel like I should look up this Myers Briggs thing for myself in my spare time, it seems like a good read.

  • A few comments (my qualifications: years of study plus I'm certified as an "MBTI practitioner".)

    For example, I was nearly 100% Introverted, but between Thinking and Feeling, it put me at Feeling with a 4%.

    I think the tests just like to give you some approximation of how close you were to the other value.

    Close. The % numbers in the online (not official) "tests" tell you how close the "scoring" algorithm believes your answers match that dichotomy. So if you get a 4% F, that doesn't mean you're "only" 4% on the Feeling side. It definitely doesn't mean you're 96% T (Both "sides" go to 100%; there's no subtraction).

    It does mean that your answers put you on the F side of the line, but probably within one question. It means the result you got is 4% confident of correctness of result. It means you need to do some additional self exploration.

    I would strongly recommend using Keirsey over MBTI. His work stems from more actual research, and , ...

    Nope. Keirsey Temperament sorting is good, yes, but not "better" than the MBTI. The MBTI also "stems from research" (a lot of research). Keirsey Temperaments and the MBTI have a very strong correlation (which I, personally, think supports the validity of both schemes.)

    The types don't include any mention of degree, and don't allow any room for people who score strongly for both or neither.

    This is because Jung's theories don;t include "degree". It really is like left- vs right-handedness. Which do you prefer? Which is more comfortable? Which do you use unconsciously? Also, the Theory states that you can't use both sides of a dichotomy at once. So, given preference and exclusivity, they really are dichotomies.

    Categorizing people... I know people who hate being defined by a label or system and reject any notions of that system or labels.

    The nice thing about the MBTI (or Keirsey, Enneagram, DISC...) is that the labels are self-selected, not "assigned" by an outside force. Unlike, say, Astrology.

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