Extra Credits: Moving Forward

This week, we discuss the need to change the conversation around video games.

Episode video is on YouTube

Show Notes:

Here's a link to the Rockethub project!
http://www.rockethub.com/projects/25243

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Recent Comments:

  • I'm not usually in the business of thread necromancy (more of a beastmaster personally), but heard something interesting to add to the conversation last week.

    Background: In Norway we have a semi-conscript service (you get called in, but it's really easy to get back out). After having been in for the first year there is a potential that you might get called back in to do Homeguard service (if you are unfamiliar with the concept think National Guard, but with even less direct training). I was called back into Homeguard service, and last week we had a training session.

    During this I was part of the Command Post, running messages around, and had some time to talk to the officers. Talking to one of them he did a lot of recruiting when not doing training of this sort, turns out they are very interested in hiring people who identify as gamers. Though not for the reasons you might immediately imagine.

    There's two main fields where self-identified "gamers" excel over others; 1) War on foreign soil is all about drones, and gamers know how to work a controller. 2) Gamers are MUCH faster than anyone else at getting an overview over a certain situation. Say you have a coordinated attack on three of your five positions at the same time, a gamer will be able to analyze the situation, break it down into the essential information, and make the most accurate decision for the information currently available on the situation.

    I have no idea if this is to be seen as a good or bad thing. I just find it interesting that within the military, whom, if one listens to the more tabloid reporting, should be looking for those with the best K/D and most hours spent shooting virtual human beings, are actually looking for qualities that have nothing to do with the "murder-sim" badge.

  • I'm not usually in the business of thread necromancy (more of a beastmaster personally), but heard something interesting to add to the conversation last week.

    Background: In Norway we have a semi-conscript service (you get called in, but it's really easy to get back out). After having been in for the first year there is a potential that you might get called back in to do Homeguard service (if you are unfamiliar with the concept think National Guard, but with even less direct training). I was called back into Homeguard service, and last week we had a training session.

    During this I was part of the Command Post, running messages around, and had some time to talk to the officers. Talking to one of them he did a lot of recruiting when not doing training of this sort, turns out they are very interested in hiring people who identify as gamers. Though not for the reasons you might immediately imagine.

    There's two main fields where self-identified "gamers" excel over others; 1) War on foreign soil is all about drones, and gamers know how to work a controller. 2) Gamers are MUCH faster than anyone else at getting an overview over a certain situation. Say you have a coordinated attack on three of your five positions at the same time, a gamer will be able to analyze the situation, break it down into the essential information, and make the most accurate decision for the information currently available on the situation.

    I have no idea if this is to be seen as a good or bad thing. I just find it interesting that within the military, whom, if one listens to the more tabloid reporting, should be looking for those with the best K/D and most hours spent shooting virtual human beings, are actually looking for qualities that have nothing to do with the "murder-sim" badge.

    Though apparently there's research to show that even the most 'mindless' of FPSes (what the tabloids usually seem to mean by 'murder sim', if they aren't meaning 'game where you can do stunts in a garbage truck') helps with critical thinking and problem solving skills.

  • Does anyone remember the Batman theatre shooting? No one blamed the movie with about 15 insane killers, but it's totally fine to call video games "murdering simulators" and assume that is what most games are.

    Dan and team are right that we don't participate in this enough to make an impact, I'm afraid to say the internet can only go so far...

  • One specific area where I wonder how many lives playing video-games have saved is with driving.

    I'm not talking just about people that play racing games, BTW. Any mildly challenging action game trains players to notice, and follow, multiple objects simultaneously, which by itself is already a tremendously useful skill in avoiding traffic accidents.

    The added hand-eye coordination should also help with preventing a dangerous situation from becoming an accident.

  • Sorry again for reviving an old topic.

    This is something I hear a lot, and I feel it's something I've been trying to do more and more, since I'm sick of constantly being under fire. I'm tired of being on the defensive, but the thing is, how do I take the offensive? Or rather, what can I do otherwise?

    It's funny, some of the examples Dan mentions... well, I've never heard of them. Really, the games that do the most good seem to be the least popular and well-known. It sucks, but then again, those games do have big-time publishers shoving those games down everyone's throats... and I'm willing to be the publishers will do something to botch those games, and move the topic around those games from something OTHER then what they're about.

    MMOs get a bad rep, and I tend to fall into the group that sees it as bad. I've heard both sides, and I tend to be on the fence about it. I won't say they're wholly good or wholly bad, just that... well, there are people who are affected in a good way and affected in a bad way...

    But yeah, so much of the bad rep about video games is based on ignorance... And like Dan, and even Bob Chipman (MovieBob/the Game Overthinker) say, we're not really going anything about it other than defending it when it's under attack and falling back, instead out outright saying the good video games can do and TEACHING people about the good they can do! ...I guess I haven't really done that much, but then again, I don't know how to go about it. This video might help in that, if only a little.

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