Extra Credits: Global Games: Mexico, Argentina & C...

This week, we take a look at some more Latin American nations and their potential for game industry growth.

Episode video is on YouTube

Show Notes:

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Recent Comments:

  • I do not like illegal immigration, but I understand it (Heck, I am even to the point of granting Amnesty, under refugee status, to people already here). I would like to see real immigration reform but not expecting it soon.

    We don't need immigration reform (which is just a bullcrap phrase which means both parties really want votes and that's it), we need south of the border reform. Think about it, if everyone is fleeing here because somehow their economies are worse than ours, the solution isn't to let them flee faster but to fix said ruined economies.

    Of course when communist dictators like chavez can become billionaires while the people starve, I don't see that happening.

  • Not a bad episode, I believe that the clarifications that you were not going 100% sure of what you were talking about were extremely unnecessary. Also, compared to Mexico's 3 minute, Argentina+Chile looked more like a side note than anything else.

    And finishing the episode with "But Brasil is probably the only one worth talking about" ...
    I just don't know... It's not completely untrue, but it feels like a unconsidered 'cheap shot'.


    1.- Despite it's HUGE economic crisis, Spain is still the biggest Spanish speaking video game market, by far. It's the 7th biggest video game market in the world, actually.

    There are three reasons for that:

    [list:l5u8702c][*:l5u8702c] You are measuring by country, not region.
    If you compared Spain to the whole LatAm region, you will probably end up loosing.[/*:m:l5u8702c]
    [*:l5u8702c] The international market provides a quality delivery service to Spain.
    In LatAm getting a game is a huge pain in the ass, you've to lurk everywhere, it's far easier to find them by chance. Forget about finding any game that's less than 3 months old. And when you do finally find that game, it's usually over-priced as hell.
    Also, there is little-to-none exposition because there is null video-game advertising.[/*:m:l5u8702c]
    [*:l5u8702c] Due the lack of quality offers, we have a HUGE black market. Black Market profits are most likely not counted as part of the "Video Game market", when they in fact should be.[/*:m:l5u8702c][/list:u:l5u8702c]

    One thing that could improve is that most Spanish localizations that are only published in Spain, leaving the rest of Spanish speaking countries with only the English version.

    The problem with translations is that there are 2 monopolies: Spain and Mexico.

    Games are localized mostly for Europe, forgetting about Latin America, in a similar way Australians or British don't get their own translations of games. While I believe it's a mistake due to population size (LatAm > Spain), I'm not outrageously against it.

    The real problem here is Mexico. Everything that has audio, from TvSeries to Movies to the few LatAm videoGames (like league of legends) is translated there. They have full monopoly over it, which makes real competition with translators from other countries (like Argentina or Bolivia) impossible.
    The few times big companies tried to hired translators from other countries, they ended up getting hit hard by Mexican dubbers. From simple complains to full-scale strikes, they managed to scare the producers into only hiring them.

  • I do not like illegal immigration, but I understand it (Heck, I am even to the point of granting Amnesty, under refugee status, to people already here). I would like to see real immigration reform but not expecting it soon.

    We don't need immigration reform (which is just a bullcrap phrase which means both parties really want votes and that's it), we need south of the border reform. Think about it, if everyone is fleeing here because somehow their economies are worse than ours, the solution isn't to let them flee faster but to fix said ruined economies.

    Of course when communist dictators like chavez can become billionaires while the people starve, I don't see that happening.


    I do not think that is a good idea. Our military was stretched too thin with two wars, invading Mexico might just cause more problems. Though, IF the Mexican government asked to join the US through statehood (or 8 states) and the people of Mexico voted in favor of that, Then the FBI could take down the cartels like we did with the Mob. That is a BIG if though, it would almost require a popular revolution lead by the people.

    I just realized that you were not talking about invading Mexico, my bad (still a good paragraph).

    Sadly, the corruption is just too rooted in Mexican government to really fix their economy. So I agree with you.

  • You are measuring by country, not region.
    If you compared Spain to the whole LatAm region, you will probably end up loosing.

    If one did that, then they wouldn't be comparing like to like. The two like to like comparisons possible are Spain (an individual country) to individual Latin American countries, and Europe as a whole, including the UK, to Latin America as a whole.

  • Catching up again... It's cool that Extra Credits actually follow up on saying that certain episodes are going to become "series's". I'm so used to the notion that people who make shows/content on the Internet promise something but never follow through on it...

    But anyway, this episode: Latin America in gaming! I like talking about Mexico, for some reason. Maybe it's because they're really so wide-spread, and they have good food.

    It's cool that he actually named some examples of games from Argentina and Chile, too. I think he mentioned Rock of Ages in one of his "Games You May Not Have Tried" videos.

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