Extra Credits: Counter Play

This week, we discuss the design concept of Counter Play (with thanks to Tom Cadwell).

Show Notes:

Grey Jenkins is a pretty skilled artist, in case you didn't know. http://greyjenkins.com

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Recent Comments:

  • This episode...

    ...are you serious?
    This is NOT, by any means, a new idea.


    Oh... I thought they said about 40 times in the video that it's probably not a new idea. I must've been dreaming.

  • This episode...

    ...are you serious?
    This is NOT, by any means, a new idea.


    Oh... I thought they said about 40 times in the video that it's probably not a new idea. I must've been dreaming.

    Okay, make that "this has been formalized before". Of course the idea can't be new if they have examples.

    EDIT:
    Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying this is a bad episode.

    It's a good one. Every point is valid. It just annoys me that such a basic concept has to be pointed out to professionals. It's like telling an animator that people should look like they were breathing. It should go without saying. But obviously, it doesn't. Which is why it's good EC did the episode. I just still find it hard to believe it's seriously necessary to tell people such a basic concept.

  • Only professionals watch EC?

    Breaking news guys, I'm a professional game developer now!

  • Around a month ago I was thinking about the 100 year game problem and how to quantify strategic depth. My solution (which still has some holes, but is still better than the old standard technique of 'total # of unique games') is "sort games by the Kolmogorov complexity of their payoff matrices".

    Putting aside the fact that finding the (exact) KC of anything is computationally intractable (same goes with finding the full matrices in a complex game in the first place), this method implies counterplay (and thereby some aspects of fun, a pleasant surprise), gives us a ballpark for how long it will take to find the optimal strategy, highlights some different design methods ("this is an interesting matrix, what kind of mechanics would imply that" (not that I expect such methods would come into play often, but I've seen weirder brainstorming methods, and, well, its another tool available to those who want it)), and even explains why I find Hollywood swordsmanship unengaging (they never use the interesting or subtle parts of the matrices (also why I'm so excited about CLANG)). I still worried about how to derive balance and fun, but I figure it'll come to me.

  • I feel bad, I've fallen WAY behind in Extra Credits, so I'm going to be playing a little bit of catch-up, starting with this episode.

    I'm not big on multiplayer, since I usually play alone, but recently, I've gotten really interested in understanding game design, which is kind of why I'm going back to watch all of this.

    Still, this does indeed sound obvious, yet I can totally see how this can get overlooked.

    Like I said, I haven't played that much multiplayer, ESPECIALLY a first-person shooter multiplayer, though getting cheap-sniped is something I heard about a lot, and immediately turns a lot of people off. I'd be turned off, too, if I actually played that.

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