Extra Credits: Collectable Games (Part 1)

This week, we begin a two-part series on the Collectable monetization model.

Episode video is on YouTube

Show Notes:

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Recent Comments:


  • ...
    Possibly the only monetization model I despise more than Pay to Win is Pay for a CHANCE to win.

    Even though what you are using to pay for these gambleboxes is virtual currency? AKA no real money used?

    I am fine with this model, I actually liked how HearthStone does it: You buy packs with gold, you get cards, you disenchant your cards for dust, you use dust to get what you really want. I believe you get gold for completing quest and winning games while dust can only be earn through disenchanting your cards.

    You get to keep the element of collectable games while still being able to get what you want if you don't like what you got.


  • Even though what you are using to pay for these gambleboxes is virtual currency? AKA no real money used?

    I am fine with this model, I actually liked how HearthStone does it: You buy packs with gold, you get cards, you disenchant your cards for dust, you use dust to get what you really want. I believe you get gold for completing quest and winning games while dust can only be earn through disenchanting your cards.

    You get to keep the element of collectable games while still being able to get what you want if you don't like what you got.


    I mean, this sort of thing has been covered in EC episodes before, no? The idea that you can offer the same base set of mechanics (in this case "gambleboxes") as a pay-to-play option AND as a play-to-play option, just with a significant enough time investment for the latter that those who can afford the former will feel compelled to take it.
    At the very least, I see no reason to consider such a practice unethical, and I honestly think that the episode makes a compelling argument as to why this sort of approach would make sense. I can see why people would be upset if paying was the ONLY way of procuring these virtual goods, but assuming that the same rules of free-to-play monetization still apply, how often would that actually be the case?

  • The weird thing here is that collectivability, as a model, is that in meatspace is all but dead (It's basically only Magic, Pokemon and Yu-Gi-Oh that stay in it, and that's mostly due to legacy - they got big while it was still a model tabletop games were able to sell); anything that would have previously been collectable release, these days, uses - if not the LCG model - then... transparent packaging on the randomised packs so you can see what you're getting before you buy (The collectable minis game that was released in the West a couple of years ago apparently got cheers from the retail sector when the company announced that they were doing transparent packaging on the randomised content rather than opaque packaging)

    So the fact it's starting to become big in digital space after it's basically been abandoned in meatspace seems downright weird to me.

  • this system would work in diablo 3 or WOW seeing as diablo 3 has a real money market place i think??? it would allow players to get a portion of their money back as long as blizzard dosen't shy away from this model and WOW because well auction house

  • The weird thing here is that collectivability, as a model, is that in meatspace is all but dead (It's basically only Magic, Pok√©mon and Yu-Gi-Oh that stay in it, and that's mostly due to legacy - they got big while it was still a model tabletop games were able to sell); anything that would have previously been collectable release, these days, uses - if not the LCG model - then... transparent packaging on the randomised packs so you can see what you're getting before you buy (The collectable minis game that was released in the West a couple of years ago apparently got cheers from the retail sector when the company announced that they were doing transparent packaging on the randomised content rather than opaque packaging)

    ...He said, before Dice Masters managed to not only be big, but sold out sufficiently hard to actually damage the game due to no store could keep the darn thing in stock...

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